Tube Factory artspace

Tube Factory artspace

Tube Factory artspace 1125 Cruft St Indianapolis, Indiana 46203

A multi-use community creativity space for everyone.

 


Upcoming Events at Tube Factory artspace


Past Events at Tube Factory artspace

Dec

12

Sun
Sun, Dec 12, 2021 11:00 AM - Sun, Dec 12, 2021 1:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

Join Snuggy Bear the Second Sunday of each month at Tube Factory artspace as he dives into the Black Film Archive with screenings and discussions, connecting the movie selected to Indianapolis.

This month he will feature the 98 minute, 1970 film,”Watermelon Man.”

“Watermelon Man is a comedy directed by Melvin Van Peebles and starring Godfrey Cambridge, Estelle Parsons, Howard Caine, D’Urville Martin, Kay Kimberley, Mantan Moreland, and Erin Moran. Written by Herman Raucher, it tells the story of an extremely bigoted 1960s-era white insurance salesman named Jeff Gerber, who wakes up one morning to find that he has become black. The premise for the film was inspired by Franz Kafka’s “Metamorphosis,” and by John Howard Griffin’s autobiographical “Black Like Me.”

Van Peebles’ only studio film, “Watermelon Man’ was a financial success, but Van Peebles did not accept Columbia Pictures’ three-picture contract, instead developing the independent film “Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song.” The music for “Watermelon Man,” written and performed by Van Peebles, was released on a soundtrack album, which spawned the single “Love, That’s America”.”–from Wikipedia.

About Snuggy Bear:
Largely underrepresented in museums and galleries, “Snuggy Bear”, Dr. Jarrod Nicholas Dortch is part of a movement of Black artists and curators who are hosting exhibits and creating work that shines a light on Black culture. He has been affiliated with Big Car as a Community Artist and Gardener at the Tube Factory artspace. He is also a member of “The Eighteen” a collective of local artists who made history by painting the #BlackLivesMatter mural on historic Indiana Avenue in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana. Since this offering he has been part of exhibitions and programs at the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis and The Indianapolis Art Center, curated “Art and Vinyl” an annual celebration of Black art and music for Big Car and has received several grants to create artworks throughout the city. His work was displayed on downtown storefronts during the NCAA Men’s and Women’s College Basketball Tournament as part of #SWISH. Dortch serves as both a professor of communication and a business owner. He owns and operates Solful Gardens, a natural produce provider in Central Indiana that brings quality food access to urban areas that are underserved with an overall focus on food equity. He also has created Snuggy Bear Presents as a way to further disrupt the status quo of contemporary and fine art. With roots in art, community, and education, Snuggy Bear is leveraging these disciplines to help promote personal and communal growth one bespoke curation at a time.

Tags: Black Film Archive, film screenings, art, Snuggy Bear

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Nov

12

Fri
Fri, Nov 12, 2021 7:00 PM - Fri, Nov 12, 2021 8:30 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

A part of the Spirit & Place Festival

Presented by Indianapolis Movement Arts Collective and Big Car

This project is supported by the Arts Midwest Touring Fund, a program of Arts Midwest that is funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional contributions from the Indiana Arts Commission and the Crane Group.

Masks are required for all attendees and volunteers. The performer will be unmasked. Limited Capacity Seating.

Photo Credit: Bryan Kwon
Change is a central element to the avant-garde Japanese dance form of Butoh. As a part of the Spirit & Place Festival, choreographer and performer Vangeline presents an original work, Eternity 123 , that asks audiences to see Butoh as a way to transmute the pain and discord of societal shifts into art.

Eternity 123, is the third installment of a feminist dance triptych choreographed and performed by Vangeline. Eternity 123 traces the symbolic journey of women’s emancipation across time. With this piece, Vangeline also celebrates the impact of women on the art form of Butoh, and “cabaret.”

Behind all significant cultural movement and changes in history, the lives of countless women can be found, as well as countless voices that have been silenced. As we challenge our collective memory by telling their stories, we redefine the importance of women’s participation in society.

Butoh is a hybrid form of dance theater that came out of Post WWII Japan. Butoh links physical and spiritual practices from around the globe and accounts for aging of differently abled bodies as well as the energetic qualities of youth. Drawing from many Eastern spiritual traditions, Butoh revalues darkness as a transformative agent and an integral aspect to growth, healing and transformation for both performer and audience alike.

ABOUT SPIRIT & PLACE: The Spirit & Place Festival (Nov. 4-14) celebrates the powerful role the arts, humanities, and religion play in community life and is housed in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Learn more at spiritandplace.org

Tags: dance, performance art, Spirit & Place

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Sep

03

Fri
Fri, Sep 03, 2021 6:00 PM - Fri, Sep 03, 2021 10:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

“The power and beauty of my queer community inspired me to create this body of work. Despite existing in predominantly conservative midwestern towns and within an oppressive society, we create safe spaces for one another to brazenly enjoy our queerness. Within these spaces we transform ourselves, celebrate, and love one another. Within these spaces we create a whole new world that celebrates and uplifts us.”–Nick May

“Fag Family,” double portraits by Nick May are a series of oil paintings, celebrating the artist’s close friends, allowing the viewer a peek into May’s life and what he celebrates about being queer. Pop cultural references and various other objects and symbols in the background offer the viewer clues to the personalities of each individual and what they mean to May. While we encounter, hear and read stories about the male and female gaze, the subjects in May’s portraits put the viewer in front of the queer gaze.

“Many of my fundamental artistic influences derive from the trauma I endured as a queer child,” says May. “The escapist avenues I ventured in adolescence like children’s novels, campy movie musicals, fantasy video games made an invariable impression upon me. Growing up with image-dump platforms like Tumblr and Instagram exposed me to many artists who influence my work: Alice Neel, Mickalene Thomas, and Jordan Casteel to name a few. As a queer adult, drag queens, experimental pop music, and queer literature has indelibly impacted me.

“The apotheosis of these influences has left me obsessed with beautiful images, creating fantasies, and the human lives around me,” says May. “Historically, portraiture was a display of wealth and power; a luxury afforded only to the rich, affluent, white aristocracy. Queer individuals, especially queer individuals of color, have been totally erased from that history. My goal with these portraits is to subvert that ugly history by capturing my fellow queer friends with all of the luxuriance and beauty of oil painting. Created with photo references, my portraits are nearly life-size and meticulously painted in order to earnestly catalog and celebrate the human lives I observe.”

Nick May is a portrait artist whose practice is deeply rooted in community and queerness. They received their Bachelors of Fine Arts with an emphasis in Painting from Ball State University and are currently working as a portrait artist in Indianapolis, Indiana. Created from photographs, their portraits are nearly life-size and meticulously painted in order to earnestly capture and celebrate the human lives they encounter.

Website: https://www.nickmay.art

Instagram: @tickgay

Tags: Art, First Fridays, Big Car, Tube Factory, LGBT+

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Jun

04

Fri
Fri, Jun 04, 2021 6:00 PM - Fri, Jun 04, 2021 10:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

Life-sized, sprawling canvases house images of animals that learned to live in new worlds, in habitats created by humans. Vidger’s painted canvases are aged with natural elements to move away from traditional, romanticized landscapes. She removes the animals from their environments, from their homes so we see them in this state of limbo, wondering where they go next. “By utilizing natural pigments to age my canvases, I present an alternative landscape that expresses the duality of desolation and splendor.”

Vidger explores common themes of survival and struggle that life confronts us all with. Her work offers the viewer opportunities to question human-focused hierarchy. “I want to confront the viewers with the power, mystery, fear, and beauty that is encapsulated within the animal gaze and the animal form to bridge the perceived line between animals and humans.”
Vidger’s work also examines society’s perceived superiority over animals. “I seek to reforge a broken relationship between people and animals by creating a physical space that viewers can reflect on the niches animals inhabit in a human-dominated landscape. My paintings balance refined and unrefined areas to represent the fracturing of animal populations and the surreal and isolated environments that animals are increasingly forced to navigate.”

Born and raised in Colorado, Vidger experienced nature growing up with day trips in the Rocky Mountains. “Subconsciously, there was a division in my mind between myself and animals. They were among the trees and rocks. And I was between ranch style homes and manicured lawns. Despite this division, I developed a kinship with animals. They felt familiar and relatable. Eventually, I developed a deep love and insatiable curiosity for wildlife. Art has long served as a way for me to satisfy and explore this passion.”

Vidger received a BFA from Adams State University and an MFA from Herron School of Art and Design with emphasis in painting and drawing. After the typical structured study of art in form, shape, and light, Vidger progressed into a focus of animal art. In her early years, surreal platforms gave way to animal form, composing voices for her subjects and their plights.

Tags: art, nonprofit, Tube Space, Big Car, First Fridays

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Mar

25

Wed
Wed, Mar 25, 2020 7:00 PM - Wed, Mar 25, 2020 8:30 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

West African dance is an essential component of West African culture. Over time, traditional dances incorporated new moves, rhythms and ideas. Through the slave trade, and through national production of traditional dance forms, West African dance has found it’s way around the globe. West African Dance has influenced many popular American dance forms, such as hip-hop, salsa and jazz dance. Traditional dances are still practiced by many people today.

Uzuri Asad caters to all levels of students and is part of Big Car’s APLR program.

Traditional West African Dance
Dance has always played a very important role in the lives of West Africans. Throughout history, West Africans performed dances to celebrate a birth, harvest or death. Communities relied on dance to ward off evil spirits, to ask the gods for prosperity, or to resolve conflict. Dance continues to serve those functions. For example, villagers perform the Malinke rhythm Kassa during farming and harvesting work. The singing, dancing and clapping entertains and motivates the hard-working farmers.

Characteristics of West African Dance
African dance, according to R.F. Thomson, has four unique qualities. First, the body moves in a multi-unit fashion, where the head and arms may move to one rhythmic pattern while the feet follow a different time signature. Second, it is percussive; the dancer interprets the rhythmic nature of the music through movement. Third, though as a whole African dance is a community event, some dancers follow different parts of the rhythm, dancing “apart” from the crowd. Finally, West African dance phrases, or sets of movements, overlap, creating a “call-and-response” pattern.

$10

Tags: West African dance, African Culture, workshop

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Mar

18

Wed
Wed, Mar 18, 2020 7:00 PM - Wed, Mar 18, 2020 8:30 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

West African dance is an essential component of West African culture. Over time, traditional dances incorporated new moves, rhythms and ideas. Through the slave trade, and through national production of traditional dance forms, West African dance has found it’s way around the globe. West African Dance has influenced many popular American dance forms, such as hip-hop, salsa and jazz dance. Traditional dances are still practiced by many people today.

Uzuri Asad caters to all levels of students and is part of Big Car’s APLR program.

Traditional West African Dance
Dance has always played a very important role in the lives of West Africans. Throughout history, West Africans performed dances to celebrate a birth, harvest or death. Communities relied on dance to ward off evil spirits, to ask the gods for prosperity, or to resolve conflict. Dance continues to serve those functions. For example, villagers perform the Malinke rhythm Kassa during farming and harvesting work. The singing, dancing and clapping entertains and motivates the hard-working farmers.

Characteristics of West African Dance
African dance, according to R.F. Thomson, has four unique qualities. First, the body moves in a multi-unit fashion, where the head and arms may move to one rhythmic pattern while the feet follow a different time signature. Second, it is percussive; the dancer interprets the rhythmic nature of the music through movement. Third, though as a whole African dance is a community event, some dancers follow different parts of the rhythm, dancing “apart” from the crowd. Finally, West African dance phrases, or sets of movements, overlap, creating a “call-and-response” pattern.

$10

Tags: West African dance, African Culture, workshop

Read More >>
Mar

11

Wed
Wed, Mar 11, 2020 7:00 PM - Wed, Mar 11, 2020 8:30 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

West African dance is an essential component of West African culture. Over time, traditional dances incorporated new moves, rhythms and ideas. Through the slave trade, and through national production of traditional dance forms, West African dance has found it’s way around the globe. West African Dance has influenced many popular American dance forms, such as hip-hop, salsa and jazz dance. Traditional dances are still practiced by many people today.

Uzuri Asad caters to all levels of students and is part of Big Car’s APLR program.

Traditional West African Dance
Dance has always played a very important role in the lives of West Africans. Throughout history, West Africans performed dances to celebrate a birth, harvest or death. Communities relied on dance to ward off evil spirits, to ask the gods for prosperity, or to resolve conflict. Dance continues to serve those functions. For example, villagers perform the Malinke rhythm Kassa during farming and harvesting work. The singing, dancing and clapping entertains and motivates the hard-working farmers.

Characteristics of West African Dance
African dance, according to R.F. Thomson, has four unique qualities. First, the body moves in a multi-unit fashion, where the head and arms may move to one rhythmic pattern while the feet follow a different time signature. Second, it is percussive; the dancer interprets the rhythmic nature of the music through movement. Third, though as a whole African dance is a community event, some dancers follow different parts of the rhythm, dancing “apart” from the crowd. Finally, West African dance phrases, or sets of movements, overlap, creating a “call-and-response” pattern.

$10

Tags: West African dance, African Culture, workshop

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Mar

10

Tue
Tue, Mar 10, 2020 7:00 PM - Tue, Mar 10, 2020 10:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

Kipp Normand will introduce and host a discussion relating the film to his current exhibition in the Main Gallery at Tube Factory artspace, ‘Snake Oil’. Attendees will have a chance to win a original Normand sculpture, “Snake Oil.”

“A kaleidoscope of tales from E.L. Doctorow’s eponymous novel evokes life in pre-World War I New York City. A white family find a black baby in their yard and takes on the mother as a maid. A black pianist, Coalhouse Walker Jr. (Howard E. Rollins Jr.), returns for his woman and child after finding success in a Harlem jazz band. Firefighters, dismayed to see a black man own a Model-T Ford, deface it, and Walker demands retribution. The white family becomes involved in Evelyn Nesbit’s trial.”

Runtime -155 minutes

Tags: film screening, Ragtime, Snake Oil, art, history, racism

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Mar

06

Fri
Fri, Mar 06, 2020 6:00 PM - Fri, Mar 06, 2020 9:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

The Other Side of Boredom
Adam Ekberg
March 6-27, 2020
Opening & Artist Talk: March 6, 6-9pm
Aurora PhotoCenter at Tube Factory

For artist Adam Ekberg, moving past boredom means finding a space in which the mind is free to devise a logic of its own, and ordinary objects are liberated from the drudgery of daily life. The resulting photographic interventions are both mysterious and delightful. Cocktail umbrellas no longer shade tropical beverages but rather occupy a sunny beach en masse. Roller skates once relegated to an indoor rink now drag-race across an empty field propelled by burning aerosol cans.

Each of these photographs begins as a sketch drawn in a studio/barn in western New Jersey. As Ekberg realizes his staged happenings, the sketches pinned to the barn walls are removed and replaced with small finished photographs—constituting a small victory. His constructions, made entirely in camera without the aid of Photoshop, are not easily decoded or resolved. Ekberg’s translation of boredom reveals the poignant beauty that can take shape, however fleetingly, when the glint of possibility leaps out from the mundane.

Adam Ekberg received his MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has recently had solo exhibitions at ClampArt, New York; DeSoto Gallery, Los Angeles; Thomas Robertello Gallery, Chicago; Platform Gallery, Seattle; and Fotografiska, Stockholm, Sweden. His work has been included in recent group exhibitions at venues such as Aran Cravey Gallery, Los Angles CA; DePaul Art Museum, Chicago; RayKo Photo Center, San Francisco; and Crawford Art Gallery, Cork Ireland. His work is in the collections of The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, and The Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, among others. He is the recipient of the Society for Photographic Education’s Imagemaker Award (2015). He was awarded a Tanne Foundation Award (2013). Ekberg has also received grants from Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs (2008, 2009, 2010) and the Union League Civic and Arts Foundation Grant (2005).

Tags: art, photography, Aurora PhotoCenter, Adam Ekberg, The Other Side of Boredom

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Mar

06

Fri
Fri, Mar 06, 2020 6:00 PM - Fri, Mar 06, 2020 10:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

In “Snake Oil,” Normand distills four centuries of history to illustrate the deep-seated American penchant for fantastical thinking. This thinking has blessed us with a wonderful capacity for imagination and creativity leading to unprecedented inventiveness and successes. But it also has a darker side, which invents justification for cruelty, exploitation and shameless self-interest. This duality is amply illustrated by events in American history. But much of that history was erased or overlooked in favor of the mythology that paints this county from start to finish as the greatest nation.

Part world’s fair exhibit, huckster wagon, dime museum, and midway arcade; Normand uses kinetic sculpture, a collage of artifacts and video to draw attention to both the beauty and strength of America as well as the exploitations that formed the foundations of capitalism. Disquieting truths like religious intolerance, the commodification of women and our role in the transatlantic slave trade are placed with respect and care in glass cases offering a chance for redemption.

“The more we ignore or cover up unpleasant facts in our history the more we empower their dark shadows to cripple our culture and continue their exploitation of the vulnerable,” says Normand. “Healing starts with acknowledgement.”

On the two monitors in the community room are four films Normand selected: “From Dawn To Sunset,” 1937, made by the General Motor Corporation, “Stripper Variety Girls,” 1938, “VD is for Everybody,” 1972, made by the American Social Health Association, and “Peter Borik,” 1942, made by the Michigan State Department of Health to address tuberculosis.

In the video room is a miniature 1920s movie palace featuring Normand’s new 17-minute short film, “Madness.” Ornate mirrors reflect back gold, gilded chairs, the viewer, and the fragmented images and sounds from the short film. The juxtaposition of machinery, environment, iconic images of Americana all set a tone in which to view “Snake Oil” in the main gallery.

Each month, Normand will alter “Snake Oil” — presenting new sustenance for viewers to re-examine the ideas of American Exceptionalism. Imbued with satire and mixed with painful truths, this haunted temple of junk casts a sideways glance at the tales we tell our children and ourselves about who we are and how we got here.

About Normand
Artist and historian Kipp Normand’s practice is a physical and conceptual investigation into the power of objects and images as a narrative device. Inspired by the Dada traditions of assemblage, collage, construction, and performance, Normand employs the acts of appropriation, reuse, and re-contextualization to explore contemporary perceptions of time, community, and memory.

Normand — who maintains a studio and workspace in Indianapolis where he creates dynamic works of visual art infused with narratives of culture, community, and history — is a scavenger and an obsessive collector. He searches back streets and alleys, junk stores and abandoned buildings, looking for clues to explain the mysteries of our world. Normand finds stories in discarded things: Stories about all of us, our cities, and our shared history. He first began making collage images, shadow boxes, and installations as a way to justify his relentless collecting. But the work soon became much more than that. It is Normand’s way to dig deeply into the vast attic of this world and to share his finds with anyone who takes the time to look. He holds a Master’s degree in American Studies from the University of Notre Dame and worked nearly 30 years in the field of heritage preservation and housing reform before turning to the practice of art.

Made possible by Indy Mod Homes, Kan Kan Cinema and Brasserie, Skyler Creative, Arts Council of Indianapolis, City of Indianapolis – Government, Sun King Brewery, and Ash & Elm Cider Co.

This exhibition would not be possible without the kindness and generosity of Todd Bracik, Emmett Baumgarten, Big Car Staff, Matt Hale, Peter Horvath, Larry Jones, Johnny McKee and many others.

Tags: Snake Oil, Part world’s fair exhibit, huckster wagon, dime museum, and midway arcade; Normand uses kinetic sculpture, a collage of artifacts and video to draw attention to both the beauty and strength of America as well as the exploitations that formed the foundations of capitalism, Kipp Normand, art, First Friday

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Feb

22

Sat
Sat, Feb 22, 2020 12:00 PM - Sat, Feb 22, 2020 3:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

We are excited to be teaming up with Normal Coffee and Tube Factory artspace for a moment of community and kinship, as part of our Conflux series.

This event is for our ENBY, nonbinary and gender nonconforming community exclusively.

Join us for a moment to be able to “shop” in a space where you are seen, as your whole self.

Please bring any clothes that you are no longer in love with and give them a chance to be loved by someone else.

There is no fee for this event and the clothes are not for sale but for swapping. In an effort to ensure everyone in our community has access, it is not mandatory to bring clothes to “shop”.

If you would like to donate clothes, they can be dropped off at Tube Factory.
Any clothes that are left over after the event will be donated (benefactor to be named).

Join us for a moment of community, where you’ll be able to look for clothing outside the confines of gender and with other ENBY and GNC folks.

Tags: Please bring any clothes that you are no longer in love with and give them a chance to be loved by someone else

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Feb

07

Fri
Fri, Feb 07, 2020 6:00 PM - Fri, Feb 07, 2020 10:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

Artist and historian Kipp Normand’s practice is a physical and conceptual investigation into the power of objects and images as a narrative device. Inspired by the Dada traditions of assemblage, collage, construction, and performance, Normand employs the acts of appropriation, reuse, and recontextualization to explore contemporary perceptions of time, community, and memory. In “Snake Oil,” Normand distills four centuries of history to illustrate the deep-seated American penchant for fantastical thinking. Part world’s fair exhibit, huckster wagon, dime museum, and midway arcade; “Snake Oil” is a multifaceted installation that challenges the viewer to re-examine the ideas of American Exceptionalism. Imbued with satire and mixed with painful truths, this haunted temple of junk casts a sideways glance at the tales we tell our children and ourselves about who we are and how we got here.

Normand — who maintains a studio and workspace in Indianapolis where he creates dynamic works of visual art infused with narratives of culture, community, and history — is a scavenger and an obsessive collector. He searches back streets and alleys, junk stores and abandoned buildings, looking for clues to explain the mysteries of our world. Normand finds stories in discarded things: Stories about all of us, our cities, and our shared history. He first began making collage images, shadow boxes, and installations as a way to justify his relentless collecting. But the work soon became much more than that. It is Normand’s way to dig deeply into the vast attic of this world and to share his finds with anyone who takes the time to look. He holds a Master’s degree in American Studies from the University of Notre Dame and worked nearly 30 years in the field of heritage preservation and housing reform before turning to the practice of art.

Exhibition made possible by Indy Mod Homes, Arts Council of Indianapolis and Sun King Brewery.

Tags: Art, History, Kipp Normand

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Feb

07

Fri
Fri, Feb 07, 2020 6:00 PM - Fri, Feb 07, 2020 9:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

Those of African descent are the most underrepresented group in the world of fine art. Black faces are beautiful. Digging deeper, we see that by working on black surfaces with white ink & paint, Reynolds draws in the light instead of the shadow, with emotive figures emerging from the deep, catching light in the way only melanin can. The stylized nature of the drawings reveals a complexity of shapes and linework, in patterns that evoke both ancient art and futuristic graphic design. The artist is also exploring his own ethnic heritage, examining roots he can only piece together, going so far as to trace his last name to the tradition of slaves taking on the surname of their master, in this case the RJ Reynolds tobacco fields. Prints will also be available of all work.
TJReynolds.net

As part of “We Catch the Light,” Reynolds asked some prominent black Indianapolis poets & singers to select someone who was influential to them in their life. He will create a portrait of that person, and the guest artist will perform a piece dedicated to them at the opening Feb 7 for a unique, one time happening bringing poetry, song and visual art together.

~~~~~~~~~~

Bio: TJ Reynolds is a multi-discipline artist and educator whose mission it is to spread the power of creativity and community. Visual artist, animator, director, M.C., producer, multi-instrumentalist and poet are just some of the creative avenues Reynolds travels on his exploits. As an educator, he has worked with thousands of students and adults in every conceivable setting; preschool through college, prisons and gifted schools, though his message remains the same; we must use art and expression to connect to each other and the world around us. Reynolds has been the recipient of numerous awards, including a Nuvo Cultural Visionary Award, Spirit of Herron (School of Art) Award, and the first ever hip-hop artist to be named a Creative Renewal Fellow from the Arts Council of Indianapolis. His music has been featured nationally on NPR, and he has won rap battles, poetry slams and a Moth Story Slam. This is Reynolds first solo art show.

~~~~~~~~~

With performances by TJ Reynolds, Teresa Reynolds, Manon Voice, Tatjana Rebelle, Derrick Slack, Sirius Blvck.

Made possible by the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

Tags: Art, First Friday, TJ Reynolds

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Feb

07

Fri
Fri, Feb 07, 2020 6:00 PM - Fri, Feb 07, 2020 10:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

Time. How do you perceive it? Is it fleeting or does it seem to go on forever? When did you first become aware of “time”? Do the minutes, hours, days blend together? Are the memories of events just as vivid now as when they actually occurred? Do memories play a significant role in what time means to you?
Where does the “time” go? Is it measured in the outcomes of our daily routines or in the singular outliers, the spectacular moments that occur irregularly and unexpectedly? This piece reveals my regimented routines over the course of a single year. When interacting with the piece, these routines become patterns. When the patterns change, the viewer is left to consider the reason why.
The images presented are my visual memories of events. In watching the piece, viewers have the opportunity to consider the past and the future simultaneously, to see the outcome before the event has actually occurred. The entire year (2012) is presented as a grid, with each image representing a day in each month of the year, starting at approximately midnight on the first day of each month and continuing to the final day of the month. From left to right, January through December is presented in its entirety until each fades into darkness. By de- constructing how a visual representation of a year is normally presented, the viewer visits an abstract representation of that year. Ultimately, a year of my life is presented in an hour, offering the viewer an opportunity to participate and find meaning in my mundane activities while simultaneously reexamining their own unrecognized minutes, hours and days.
366247•2012 is a time-based piece, rooted in still photography, and can be presented as a video or video projection installation. The more than 256,000 still images, presented as a photographic stop-motion animation, allow the viewer to witness my day-to-day routines, the same acts that everyone engages in on a regular or daily basis.

Kevin O. Mooney (b. 1957) is an educator and fine artist as well as a successful commercial photographer. He received his BS from Southern Illinois University and his MFA from Indiana University Bloomington. Mooney has been the recipient of Artist Fellowship from the Illinois Arts Council in 1987. His photographic work is included in collections at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Kinsey Institute in Bloomington, Indiana, the Illinois State Museum in Springfield, Illinois, Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Washington and the Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, New York. His work has been exhibited at the MFAH, Catherine Edelman Gallery Chicago, Pictura Gallery at FAR Center for Contemporary Arts, Grunwald Gallery of Art, Gallery 312 and the Chicago Architecture Foundation as well as internationally at the Lee Yongjae Architects’ Window Gallery, and the Seoul Lunar Photo Fest, Lunar Photo Night Seoul, Korea. His project, 366247•2012 was just chosen by Center Santa Fe for the 2019 Excellence in Multimedia Award. His current work continues to investigate self, consciousness, and individuality through sequentially presented still photographs arranged as a stop-motion animation. He blurs the edges between various disciplines within the photographic field as well as those between photography and other digital media.

The exhibit runs through February 22 in the Jeremy D. Efroymson Gallery.

Made possible by the Arts Council of Indianapolis, Sun King Brewery and Ash & Elm Cider Co..

Tags: Art, First Friday, Kevin O. Mooney

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Jan

16

Thu
Thu, Jan 16, 2020 6:00 PM - Thu, Jan 16, 2020 8:30 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

St’artUp 317 successfully matches young brands, established businesses, startups and artists, with prime vacant and under-utilized properties. Resulting in pop-up stores, art installations, and event activations, the program’s long-term goal is to eliminate empty storefronts, support small business owners & artists, increase local and visitor consumer spending and ensure that Marion county neighborhoods continue thriving.

As we enter Season 3, we want to continue spreading the word about the program, and provide opportunity to as many qualifying brands and vendors as possible to take part. Applications for Season 3 open on 1/20, and pop-ups take place during May.

Come meet fellow brands, artists, landlords and civic and non-profit leaders and learn more about how St’Artup 317 is working to help strengthen our neighborhoods and your businesses.

Refreshments will be provided.

Thank you to Big Car for hosting!

St’Artup 317 is a partnership between Develop Indy and PATTERN. For more information, visit www.startup317.com.

Tags: St’artUp 317 successfully matches young brands, established businesses, startups and artists, with prime vacant and under-utilized properties

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Jan

03

Fri
Fri, Jan 03, 2020 6:00 PM - Fri, Jan 03, 2020 10:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

“My recent installations are best described as landscapes created through expanded painting techniques. I gravitate toward materials that are accessible and quotidian, yet also project certain elemental qualities, such as light, space, or line. The interspersion of miniature sculpture within the landscape brings a human component into the otherwise formal work. The sculpture are stand ins for myself — they are observing, contemplating, elucidating their physical and mental environment. They remind me that ultimately my work is centered on describing the human condition to the maximum extent that I can perceive it.”

Stormy Weather depicts cyclical expressions of anxiety by layering patterns repeatedly into surfaces and space. The paintings and assemblages explore intimate, personal anxiety, and multiply/mirror/repeat the individual to reflect a larger communal state of unease and worry — a collective angst. Uncertainty is stressful, but it is a precursor to transformation. Perhaps this low level sense of dread is a catalyst for a shift, a renewal. Despite the angst, these artworks are ultimately optimistic. Similar to uncertainty, the anxious processes of layering and repetition are the means of revealing clarity, light, and sublime color interaction. Sunlight is rarely more beautiful than when it follows a storm.

Priya Wittman is an artist living and working in Indianapolis. She received her BFA in 2011 and MFA in 2016 from Herron School of Art & Design in Indianapolis. She has been the recipient of multiple scholarships and awards, including a summer fellowship award in 2009 at Ox-Box School of Art in Saugatuck, Michigan. She has exhibited in several states across the US, and completed a residency at AIR Studio Paducah in Kentucky. In addition to her studio practice, she periodically teaches painting and drawing courses as adjunct faculty at Herron School of Art, and works at Ignition Arts, an arts fabrication company based in Indianapolis.

Join us for First Friday in January to catch the opening reception of Stormy Weather from 6-10pm.

This show will be available from January 3-24.

Efroymson Gallery
1125 Cruft Street Indianapolis, IN 46203
M-F (7am-6pm)
Sa (8am-3pm)

Tags: Priya Wittman, Stormy Weather depicts cyclical expressions of anxiety by layering patterns repeatedly into surfaces and space, Art, First Friday

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Dec

07

Sat
Sat, Dec 07, 2019 11:00 AM - Sat, Dec 07, 2019 12:30 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

Are you an artist who wants to engage and help shape a community? Located on a block in both the Garfield Park and Bean Creek neighborhoods on the near southside of Indianapolis, the Artist and Public Life Residency (APLR) program is an innovative and experimental approach to supporting artists who use their talents and skills to help drive positive change in the community. Come today and learn more.

Click here to apply or go to https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PHZ6YFV

For this program, we view the label of artists to include creatives, makers, and designers. Fields include — and are not limited to — architecture, culinary art, curation, visual art, public art, furniture, fashion, craft, design, film and video, creative writing and journalism, performing arts, music, theater, placemaking, socially engaged art, etc.

The APLR — taking applications for resident artists now through December 23, 2019 — is a long-term, affordable and community-invested artist home ownership program as part of a community land trust approach.

Applicants will be notified if they moved on as semi-finalists by January 6. Finalists will be selected by mid January. Public information sessions will be at Tube Factory art space December 5th, 6 pm and December 7th, 11 am.

In partnership with Riley Area Development and supported by Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership (INHP), the APLR’s goal is to provide artists enjoyable and equitable home ownership while they work — in part — to collaborate with other neighbors and boost the culture, creativity, diversity, livability, safety, health, and economy of the local and greater community. This is a reboot of the program launched two years ago before pausing to work out various aspects of the program and partnership. So far three families have been placed into the homes.

Tags: Artist and Public Life Residency (APLR) program, information, housing assistance for artists

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Dec

06

Fri
Fri, Dec 06, 2019 6:00 PM - Fri, Dec 06, 2019 10:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

Join us for a collaborative exhibition between the Garfield Park Arts Center and the Tube Factory Artspace set to highlight artists of Garfield Park and Bean Creek.

Set between lush trees and historic homes the Garfield Park neighborhood is a hub to a diverse community of artists. Let us celebrate who creates here and how this historic park has influences our lives.

This exhibition will be on display at the Tube Factory Artspace from December 6-20.

We are looking for local makers, artisans, vendors, visual, sound and performance artists!

Submissions are open until November 1:
https://forms.gle/s4zbQPZHunJX7ySY6

Efroymson Gallery
Tube Factory Artspace
1125 Cruft Street, Indianapolis, IN 46203
M-F / 7am-6pm
Sa / 8am-3pm

Tags: collaborative exhibition between the Garfield Park Arts Center and the Tube Factory Artspace set to highlight artists of Garfield Park and Bean Creek, First Friday, Art

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Nov

29

Fri
Fri, Nov 29, 2019 6:00 PM - Fri, Nov 29, 2019 9:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

Bring ItPeer 2 Peer Artist Critique
Pasta Pitch-in | Homebrew
For Emerging and Mid-career Visual Artists
Last Friday | 6-9 PM

Bring art for critique or a dish to share***** If your interested to critique there is time for 3 artists, if you are a collaborative or a group please notify.

RSVP to sign up for a critique spot contact:[email protected]
Please send me your name and a brief description of the work you are bringing and any special accommodations.

A simple pasta dinner and homebrew will be provided, bring a dish to share and any serving bowls.

Free! All ages of the public are encouraged to attend! Children and partners encouraged!

Tags: Artist Critique, Pasta Pitch-in | Homebrew, Tube Factory Art Space

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Nov

06

Wed
Wed, Nov 06, 2019 6:00 PM - Wed, Nov 06, 2019 8:00 PM @ Tube Factory artspace

What does it mean to fit in? How do we do so when who we are conflicts with our community? How does our decision create a society in which fitting in does not require becoming someone we are not? Join Maria Hamilton Abegunde, who uses African-based spiritual practices to heal intergenerational trauma; Brenda Weber, who as a teenager grew up non-Mormon in a Mormon community; and Ellise Antoinette Smith, creator of Fatness Fiction to explore how friction points between personal and community (r)evolution can help us grow spiritually and as human beings. Attend one session or all.

Tags: Healing from body shaming, self-love, acceptance, Spirit & Place

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